Emotional Cancer- 3- Fear

So I did this thing.

I went to Africa.  I was invited last year to speak at a conference in Tanzania, Africa and I agreed to go, but, a year later, when it got real that I was scheduled to make this trip, my dark side started working on my confidence.

  • It’s 8,811 miles away!
  • What if you get in an accident?
  • There have been terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka.
  • You are getting too old for 15-hour plane rides.
  • What if you get sick while you’re there?

You have to understand that I’ve been on such trips before. In fact, I have made over 20 trips to other countries to speak and minister.  I’ve even been to Africa before.

None the less, I was feeling fear…  not full-blown panic, but anxiety on a minor level.

I am writing this post from the conference in Arusha, Tanzania, and I’m delighted that I came. I’ve once again filled my life with sights, smells, and the people of Africa.  It is amazing! Why did I ignore my fears and take this trip? I did it because of some core mental distinctions I have around fear. These distinctions are:

  • You are only as young as the new experiences you are having. Don’t let fear make you old before your time by limiting your adventures.
  • You will die eventually, why not fill the time doing things that excite and expand you?
  • You must force your imagination to serve you by creating new dreams, not worries that shrink your world.
  • You have a limited “shelf-life.”  Don’t wait too late to take some chances in life.

I constantly encounter people who have allowed fear to limit their lives.  Not justifiable fear, like avoiding dangerous places and people, but imagined fears blown out of proportion. These are the people who die long before they are buried.

Mark Twain said, “I’ve had a long life, full of many dangers, most of which never happened.”

What’s the thing you need to do?  Force your fear into submission and get busy living a life that inspires you and others. Oh, and send me a response in the contact line.  I want to know what fear you conquered.

Kwa Heri – (goodbye in Swahili)